Wednesday , 17 September 2014
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Branigan interview

Interview with Megan Branigan, the only musician behind Branigan. Her music is characterized by progressive passages, epic and melodic winds and clean vocals combined with black registers.

Listen to Branigan while reading the interview:

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l 63fd72234d6807328cd0f2c7bc298395 190x300 Branigan interviewWhich is the current Branigan status, are you recording, on hiatus, composing?
I wouldn’t say that I’m on hiatus. I’ve just been brainstorming; heading in a new direction.

And the steps to follow in the near future? Which are your expectations for Branigan?
I honestly can’t say what I’m expecting to come of it. I would like to have a full line-up. I would like to just assume vocals and songwriting.

You started in 2003 as Origin Of Silence, and published “Mirage World Revival” in 2005. What have happened since then in Branigan?
Nothing has happened. I’ve just been thinking a lot, and working on other music not relating to Branigan. I have a few ideas for songs, but nothing solid just yet.

Their songs are promising, but I think they don’t have the deserved production. Have you thought of rerecording them in better conditions?
I would have to say probably not. I might decide, later on, to take a couple of them and rework them somehow. They just don’t seem to fit the atmosphere I’m going for these days.

Are you responsible of all instruments and voices in Branigan? And of all the composing process?
I would have to say for now; yes. Everything on “Mirage World Revival” was me. Hopefully that will be changing shortly.

Being a one-woman project has its good and bad things. Can you tell some of them, and why do you decided to make music by your own?
It’s good because you don’t have to rely on other people. It’s a lot harder to have band mates make the music sound the way you hear it in your head. Doing music on your own is hard, frustrating, and if you’re a perfectionist, your musicianship may not be up-to-par with what you want to hear. That’s when it’s good to have people help, and why I’ve decided to pursue that in the future.

One of the bad features is the difficulty to bring your music live. Have you ever played a gig as Branigan (or Origin Of Silence)?
No; I wouldn’t do that without a full line-up. I enjoy playing shows and would like to do so with Branigan.

Being just by yourself is it the best way to fully express yourself musically?
I answered that in a previous question, but certainly. It’s a lot easier to correct something yourself than it is to constantly have to go over parts with your band mates. I think I’ve become more open to extra input lately.

And lyrically? What are your lyrics about, do they reflect introspective thoughts? Do you show yourself in them?
I can tell you that most of the lyrics I’ve written are relating to dreams I’ve had. They’re a mixture of dreams and nature.

l b7783668da29ffd1b87c3057fa23be69 283x300 Branigan interviewYou are melting black, melodic, epic and progressive elements. Your music is original, it has your own label. But, which are the bands that has influenced you the most?
Iron Maiden, Vintersorg, Korpiklaani, Skyforger, Bal-Sagoth, Judas Priest, and Moonsorrow. I listen to a lot of different styles of music, but these are the metal artists that have influenced me the most.

Talking about labels, have you found any record label interested in your music?
I haven’t at this point in time. It’s perfectly understandable; the quality of Origin of Silence wasn’t too great and my resources were limited.

There are other one-woman bands/projects, like Aythis, Turdus Merula, Coldnight, Branigan, Terra Teratos, Lidande, Melencolia Estatica, Cadukeya. Do you know/like any of them?
I haven’t heard of any of these.

Are you collaborating with any other bands, do you have time enough to dedicate to Branigan?
I’m currently working with someone to revive a band called Llyfyrion. The music was excellent, but most of the musicians fell short and they split up awhile back. It’s a very promising band, possibly more so than Branigan. I do feel that I’ll still have plenty of time to dedicate to Branigan.

Internet seems to the best way at the moment to promote your music. Are you receiving good feedback from around the world?
Yeah, I have. I think the Internet can become bogged down with too many artists though, so you have to find key places to promote. Review websites are good for this.

And is there any way people can get your LP?
Sure. Send me an e mail (braniganmegan@gmail.com) and for five U.S. dollars it can be yours!

Tell the readers why Branigan is worth to take a listen.
It’s good for those of you who enjoy music with a strange atmosphere. I’m honestly a bit frightened by some of the stuff I come up with. I like creating music that is somehow attached to the dream world; surreal and cold. If I can leave you completely blank after listening to some of my music, then I’ve done my job. It exists only for that purpose.

Read more about Branigan

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